Carey Mulligan for The New York Times


Written by Elise on December 24 2020

The NY Times – […] “I know that for a cinema audience, I’m just constantly in period costume,” Mulligan said recently, shrugging her shoulders in an oversized red sweater. She was video-chatting with me from her British country house in Devon, where she had sequestered herself in a darkened music room typically used by her husband, Marcus Mumford, from the band Mumford & Sons. A single, solitary lamp illuminated her, as single, solitary lamps often do with Mulligan.

[…] The film [i.e. Promising Young Woman] is a tonal tightrope walk, and Mulligan is astonishing in it. There is so much about Cassie that an actress might be tempted to overplay — her biting sense of humor, her well-defended soulsickness, the startling lengths to which she’ll go in her mission — but Mulligan makes the character feel achingly real. And sometimes, as if it were as easy as breathing, she can convey all of those warring traits in the space of a single line.

She is so unfailingly truthful and about as grounded as an actress gets,” said Emerald Fennell, the writer-director of “Promising Young Woman.” By casting Mulligan, Fennell sought to steer clear of a more stereotypical presentation of female revenge, which would portray Cassie as “a woman walking down the street in slow-mo with a fire burning behind her,” as Fennell put it.

[…] Does she feel she’s been typecast as a period actress? Mulligan is quick to point out that she’s played at least two contemporary roles onstage over the last several years, in “Girls & Boys” and “Skylight.” But really, she said, it’s just rare for a contemporary movie to come along with an antiheroine as complicated as Cassie, whose mission is righteous even when her methods may be mad.

I never feel like I need to agree with everything that a character does for me to be along with the ride, and we never do with men,” Mulligan said. “Cassie has every right to be as closed down, as abrasive, as unpleasant, as vindictive as she likes, because she’s been through hell. But that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t care about her.

Photoshoots & Portraits > 2020 > Session 16 [+03]

[…] “I read the Variety review, because I’m a weak person,” Mulligan said. “And I took issue with it.” She paused, debating whether she really wanted to go there. “It felt like it was basically saying that I wasn’t hot enough to pull off this kind of ruse,” she said, finally.

[…] Mulligan can still recite some of the lines from that review. But she said, “It wasn’t some sort of ego-wounding thing — like, I fully can see that Margot Robbie is a goddess.” What bothered Mulligan most was that people might read a high-profile critique of any actress’s physical appearance and blithely accept it: “It drove me so crazy. I was like, ‘Really? For this film, you’re going to write something that is so transparent? Now? In 2020?’ I just couldn’t believe it.

[…] “We don’t allow women to look normal anymore, or like a real person,” Mulligan said. “Why does every woman who’s ever onscreen have to look like a supermodel? That has shifted into something where the expectation of beauty and perfection onscreen has gotten completely out of control.

“I just don’t think that’s really what storytelling or acting needs to be about,” she said. “Things can be beautiful without being perfect.”

Carey Mulligan and Emerald Fennell for Variety


Written by Elise on December 09 2020

Variety – “Promising Young Woman,” a radical, genre-blending thriller […] introduces Fennell as both a distinct cinematic voice and a blunt social commentator. Mulligan stars as Cassie, a former medical student whose life has been derailed by the rape of her best friend, Nina. After dropping out of school to care for the broken Nina, who is never seen in the movie, Cassie is adrift and boiling over with rage. […] Drenched in neon pink and baby-blue hues, “Promising Young Woman” looks playful on its surface, but yanks the rug out from under viewers. Among other things, the film is a stunningly unapologetic indictment of men and the societal mechanisms that support rape culture.

It’s a sort of beautifully wrapped candy, and when you eat it you realize it’s poisonous,” Mulligan says of the film.

Yet if these descriptions make “Promising Young Woman” sound dogmatic, or strident, it never is: Against all odds, given its subject matter, the movie is fun as hell. “Promising Young Woman” combines elements from revenge movies, romantic comedies and suspense thrillers — brewed together to create something volcanic.

Fennell, who’s 35, the same age as Mulligan, developed “Promising Young Woman” in 2017 with Margot Robbie’s company, LuckyChap Entertainment, which came on board as producer immediately after hearing her pitch: the movie’s cold open, in which Cassie surprises a potential rapist by dropping her drunken act. LuckyChap co-founder Josey McNamara says their reaction was “Whatever the rest of it is, we want to do it.

If there was ever a thought that Robbie might play Cassie — yes, she was tempted. “This was a hard one to step aside for,” Robbie says. “But I felt like I would perhaps be the kind of Cassie people might expect, you know? And I feel like someone like Carey — we just haven’t seen her do this. She brings gravitas to it.

Press > 2020 > Variety (December) [+01]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2020 > Session 15 [+04]

[…] “Promising Young Woman” was scheduled for release in April, but — well, we all know what happened then. […] With this movie, the filmmakers, the studio and the punch-drunk Sundance premiere audience would unanimously agree that “Promising Young Woman” is a singular theatrical experience — especially with an ending that will get people talking. “This is something you want to see with other people,” Robbie says.

Add to that the film’s serious awards potential this year, and that’s twice the pressure on Focus to make the right choice. The distributor is rolling out the film in theaters on Christmas Day, with an accelerated streaming premiere targeted for January.

Why was it unlike anything you’d ever read, Carey?
It’s so lovely to read something and have no idea where it’s going, and you’re wrong-footed at every turn. Every time you decided something about somebody, it was ripped away from you and changed.

Carey, you’ve spoken before about being resistant to “wives and girlfriends” roles — how does this fit in your body of work?
“Promising Young Woman” exists in its own genre, and that role is so unique. I felt like definitely I wanted to be a part of something contemporary that was an original idea and not an adaptation, as much as I love those. I’ve been resistant to playing characters that are just the wife or the girlfriend, and I’ve avoided that fairly consistently so far. You can still understand a character and go with them on their journey even if you don’t approve of them or feel totally comfortable. I’m trying to find characters who are a little less straightforward, and you don’t get all the answers. I want to be constantly surprising the audience. I loved working with comedians. I feel so open to that kind of stuff, but, for me, it’s never struck the right tone. I want to be in a Richard Curtis film and live in a lovely apartment. I know Richard Curtis, and I say this to him all the time. He knows.

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First look at Netflix’s “The Dig”


Written by Elise on October 29 2020

Netflix has released the first look at the upcoming film “The Dig,” based on the 2007 novel of the same name by John Preston, and starring Carey Mulligan, Lily James, and Ralph Fiennes. It tells the story of the most famous archaeological dig in modern British history – the discovery of the Anglo-Saxon burial ship at Sutton Hoo, known as “Britain’s Tutankhamun”.

Carey stars as Edith Pretty, an English landowner on whose land the Sutton Hoo ship burial was discovered after she had paid Basil Brown (Ralph Fiennes), a local archaeologist, to find out if anything lay beneath the mounds on her property.

According to Digital Spy, Lily James admitted that the dark nature of the film and the paranoia her character experiences had a big impact on her while filming. “Towards the end of making it, I started getting this thing where my heart was beating so loudly that you could hear it,” she said. “It’s really scary. All of a sudden, you become very, very aware of your heartbeat and you can feel it going really fast. And when you look at the psychological aspect of the book, and the darkness and the twistedness in it, it suddenly made sense.”

High-quality production stills have been added to our gallery.

Feature Films > The Dig (2021) > Production Stills [+04]

Focus Feature Sets “Promising Young Woman” Christmas Release Date


Written by Elise on October 09 2020

Variety – There’s at least one thing promising about the holidays: “Promising Young Woman,” a revenge thriller starring Carey Mulligan, is hitting theaters on Christmas Day.

While most movies are fleeing the release calendar this year, “Promising Young Woman” is one of the few films to take a chance on an unpredictable 2020. As it stands, it will compete against “Wonder Woman 1984” on the big screen on Dec. 25.

Focus Features is owned by Universal, the studio that recently signed a pact with theater chain AMC to allow films to premiere on premium video-on-demand within three weeks of their theatrical debuts. Since the deal extends to Focus, the specialty label has something of a safety net if audiences don’t turn out en masse to see “Promising Young Woman.” They can put it on digital rental services after 17 days, without having to worry about additional marketing costs.

[…] Emerald Fennell, a showrunner on “Killing Eve,” wrote and directed “Promising Young Woman” in her feature directorial debut. It premiered at Sundance Film Festival to strong reviews, with critics praising Mulligan’s performance. Vanity Fair’s critic Richard Lawson called Mulligan “consistently riveting throughout.” “Even when the movie occasionally loses its way,” he wrote, “Mulligan carries it along, selling every twist and reveal in mesmerizing fashion.” […]

Feature Films > Promising Young Woman (2020) > Movie Posters [+01]

Carey Mulligan for InStyle Magazine (June 2020)


Written by Elise on May 06 2020

InStyle – […] Commitment is ingrained in Mulligan, who, at 35, has been married to musician Marcus Mumford (of the folkrock band Mumford & Sons) for eight years and has two children, Evelyn, 4, and Wilfred, 2. When they’re not touring or filming, the family divide their time between their home in London and farm in Devon. It’s by FaceTime that I catch up with Mulligan, who is in Devon, in her second week of self-isolation from COVID-19. (She flashes her phone around to point out some cows languidly walking past her house.) Now, Mulligan and I once had a grand plan to shoot her cover story in Paris, have dinner afterward, the whole tra-la-la. Due to looming travel restrictions, I had to leave early for New York, but Mulligan kept her commitment, gamely shooting this story in cold, rainy weather with a skeleton crew. A week later, even that would be impossible.

Press > 2020 > InStyle Magazine (June) [+01]
Photoshoots & Portraits > 2020 > Session 13 [+09]

Carey, I have to thank you for making it to Paris for this shoot. It was literally the last story we were able to complete before we all went into lockdown.Ah. Well, at that point the train stations were still jammed, no one was wearing masks, and they weren’t advising people not to travel. But once I got to Paris, it felt odd. I brought one of my best friends, and we were like, “What if we get stuck here? What if someone has it in the hotel?” A week later, none of us would have gone. But I have to say, Paris was still fun. We stayed up late and watched Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid in French.

Our subscriber cover image is you, all dressed up in Givenchy, in front of the Eiffel Tower. It’s so glamorous but very poignant now. There were huge crowds of people there that day. Now, life has been shut down in that sense. Our ability to travel is curtailed, but we’re all still curious. I found it so cool how many monuments, zoos, and aquariums started live streaming their exhibits.

How much of that are you doing? Are you on Zoom?I’ve been using Houseparty with my two best friends every Sunday at 8:30 a.m. We’ve all got kids, so we put the TV on for them and sit in bed with a big cup of coffee and catch up, which has been quite nice.

You’ve also been working with the organization War Child, right?Yes. War Child runs child-friendly spaces in refugee camps and conflict zones where children can be protected and educated. Fundraising has come to a grinding halt because the economy has taken such a hit, so I’m planning to take over their Instagram to get more people interested. Marcus also released a cover of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” and all proceeds go to War Child UK and The Grenfell Foundation. It’s such a beautiful song.

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